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Invasion of the Pod People

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Queering the Archives

What do we know about queer lives and stories from the past? In November, we’ll delve into LGBTIQA+ histories with a special live recording of the Archive Fever podcast.

Archive Fever is an Australian history podcast of conversation with writers, artists, curators and historians about the possibilities and limitations of archival records. At this event, hosts Clare Wright and Yves Rees will be joined by historian Noah Riseman and trans scholar and activist Julie Peters to discuss the absence of queer people, especially trans and gender diverse people, from conventional records and historical data. 

Where else might we go to locate a trans or non-binary lineage? What records may LGBTIQA+ elders and predecessors have kept, and how we can recover and integrate queer figures and stories into our broader understanding of Australian history? Join us as we discuss how to set the record queer.

Who?

Portrait of Noah Riseman

Noah Riseman

Noah Riseman is an Associate Professor in History at the Australian Catholic University. He is the author of Serving in Silence? Australian LGBT Servicemen and Women (2018) and is the Chief Investigator on the Australian Research Council-funded project 'Transgender Australians: The History of an Identity.'

Portrait of Julie Peters

Julie Peters

Julie Peters is still naïve enough to believe the world can be a better place and has been activist in trying to make it happen as a performer, writer, parliamentary candidate, practical environmentalist, media professional and doctoral researcher (sociology/public health of gender/transgender). 

In trying to keep up in all these areas Julie has found herself an accidental curator, at last count 18 filing cabinets, six of which are on the portrayal of trans in the media since the 1970s.

Portrait of Yves Rees

Yves Rees

Yves is an award-winning historian based at La Trobe University. A settler Australian living and working on Wurundjeri land, Yves has published widely across Australian gender, transnational and economic history and is a regular contributor to the Conversation and ABC radio. Yves has degrees from the University of Melbourne, University College London and the Australian National University, and previously worked at the University of Sydney. Yves is the co-editor of Transnationalism, Nationalism and Australian History (Palgrave, 2017) and their first monograph Travelling to Tomorrow: Australian Women and the American Century is forthcoming with Nebraska University Press.

Portrait of Clare Wright

Clare Wright

‘I am a feminist therefore I commit feminist acts. I’m not going to undermine the political importance of what I do.’

La Trobe University historian Associate Professor Clare Wright has worked as an author, academic, political speechwriter, historical consultant, and radio and TV broadcaster. Her latest book, You Daughters of Freedom: The Australians Who Won the Vote and Inspired the World, has been praised by Senator Penny Wong and Anne Summers. Her earlier book, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, won the 2014 Stella Prize and the 2014 NIB Award for Literature.

How much?

This is a free event. Bookings are essential. We recommend arriving early to secure your seat. Read our ticketing FAQs here.Book your tickets

Invasion of the Pod People

In the last few years, podcasts have matured into the storytelling format du jour – with a little help from a certain sensationally popular true crime serial (ahem). Yet the surge of interest and excitement around audio features and podcasts has been gaining momentum for even longer, propelled by a diversity of formats.

Take the narrative artisanship of This American Life or the sonic vivacity of Radiolab; the topical deep dives of Slate’s Culture Gabfest or Phillip Adams’s Late Night Live; the animated storytelling of The Moth or Sum of All Parts; or the intimate conversations found in Death, Sex and Money or WTF with Marc Maron. The influence of these and countless other shows can be felt in today’s most interesting podcasts (insert shameless plug for the Wheeler Centre’s own successful forays into richly-produced feature-making, including Andrew Denton’s Better Off Dead, and The Messenger, here). 

Beloved for their sense of proximity, their active listenership, portability and in some cases, ambitiously-crafted audio, podcasts have a unique ability to keep listeners in the company of their own choosing – and to render mundane tasks bearable. And since design show 99% Invisible’s record-breaking Kickstarter campaigns – podcasts have also shown promise in otherwise dim times for media businesses. What’s next for podcasting – and how could it be done better?

In celebration of all things audible, we’re bringing you some of podcasting’s best and brightest to share their thoughts and insights on the art (and business) of listening. 

Where?

More about this venue, including large map, parking, public transport and accessibility.