Part of a podcast series

The Wheeler Centre

View all episodes in this series

Glory Edim: Well-Read Black Girl

Listen to Glory Edim: Well-Read Black Girl

‘We can’t just rely on Toni and Alice and Zora,’ Well-Read Black Girl founder Glory Edim has said. ‘These women are the foundation, but what does the next generation look like? How can we uplift that?’

Edim, based in Brooklyn, founded the Well-Read Black Girl (WRBG) book club back in 2015. Since then, the club has grown into a major literary phenomenon. The club meets monthly, in real life, to discuss the work of emerging and established writers. It also exists online, with live-streamed events and lively social media conversation.

Black women writers and readers are front and centre in Edim’s club. As the WRBG movement grows, Edim has hosted some incredible, award-winning authors at meetings, including Angela Flournoy, Naomi Jackson and Margo Jefferson. She’s even run a one-day WRBG festival.

At this event with Santilla Chingaipe, Edim discusses the founding and future of the club and the next generation of black women writers. The pair is then joined by author Maxine Beneba Clarke for a real-life WRBG book club meeting, discussing Clarke’s memoir, The Hate Race.

Who?

Portrait of Glory Edim

Glory Edim

Glory Edim is the founder of Well-Read Black Girl, an online book club-turned-literary festival that celebrates the uniqueness of Black literature and sisterhood. Well-Read Black Girl’s mission is to increase the visibility of Black women writers and initiate meaningful conversation with readers using social media. 

Portrait of Santilla Chingaipe

Santilla Chingaipe

‘Celebrities and corporations spew forth “smash the patriarchy” and benefit financially from that. You want to talk about boards? I want to talk about how some women can’t get a job.’

Santilla Chingaipe is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker. Chingaipe created and hosted the Africa Talks series in partnership with the Wheeler Centre, which explored perceptions about African-Australian identity, representation and politics. She also curated Australia’s first all-day, anti-racism festival, Not Racist, But.... Her work explores contemporary migration, cultural identities and politics. She reports regularly for the Saturday Paper and is a member of the federal government’s advisory group on Australia-Africa relations.

Portrait of Maxine Beneba Clarke

Maxine Beneba Clarke

Maxine Beneba Clarke is a widely published Australian writer of Afro-Caribbean descent. Maxine's short fiction, non-fiction and poetry have been published in numerous publications including Overland, the AgeMeanjin, the Saturday Paper and the Big Issue. Her critically acclaimed short fiction collection Foreign Soil won the ABIA for Literary Fiction Book of the Year 2015 and the 2015 Indie Book Award for Debut Fiction, and was shortlisted for the Matt Richell Award for New Writing at the 2015 ABIAs and the 2015 Stella Prize. She was also named as one of the Sydney Morning Herald's Best Young Novelists for 2015. 

The Wheeler Centre

Subscribe to the Wheeler Centre's podcast to hear full recordings of our talks – featuring the best in books, writing and ideas.