A League of One’s Own: The AFL, and Women’s Sport

A League of One's Own: The AFL, and Women's Sport

There’s nothing new about women playing Australian Rules Football – they’ve been doing it for as long as men have. Local clubs for girls and women have existed for decades; there are now almost 1,000 of them around the country. Last year, participation jumped by 19% – with 380,000 Australian women playing throughout the year.

It’s always been clear that many women love the game; they comprise a large proportion of crowds watching men’s AFL matches, too. This year’s launch of the AFL’s National Women’s League – brought forward three years, due to popular response – marks a major milestone in women’s ability to compete at the highest level. But another test looms: the League will have to prove its appeal with sponsors and advertisers in order to grow and endure.

So – what did the inaugural 2017 season reveal to us? What will it take to ensure the success of the Women’s League, and what can advocates for other sports learn?

Sports reporter Karen Lyon hosts this conversation with fellow journalist and author Angela Pippos, former Western Bulldogs VP (and longtime champion of women’s footy) Susan Alberti and former AFL commissioner and AFL life membership recipient Sam Mostyn. Alongside Carlton co-vice captain Bri Davey and marquee player Darcy Vescio, they share their insights on the transformations taking place in Australian sport; about the so-called ‘grass ceiling’, and about how the media plays a part in the way women’s sport is played, seen and funded.

Who?

Portrait of Susan Alberti

Susan Alberti

Susan Alberti AC is one of Australia’s pre-eminent philanthropists, having donated millions of dollars to medical research and other charitable causes over her successful business career.

Portrait of Bri Davey

Bri Davey

Carlton secured Brianna Davey as one of its marquee players for its inaugural women’s team in 2017.

The 21-year-old began her professional sporting career playing soccer, even making the Matildas national squad as goalkeeper. 

After winning the 2016 W-League championship with Melbourne City, Davey decided to switch codes, making her one of only a handful of female footballers that have played another sport at the highest level.

Portrait of Karen Lyon

Karen Lyon

For more than two decades, Karen Lyon has covered Melbourne and its sports-obsessed culture. She was a political reporter before crossing the boundary line to sport in 1999, and has been covering the world of sport ever since.

Portrait of Sam Mostyn

Sam Mostyn

Sam Mostyn is the President of the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) and a widely sought after non-executive director and sustainability adviser. She is Chair of Citibank Australia and Carriageworks, sits on the boards of Virgin Australia, Transurban Group, Mirvac and CoverMore as well as the Diversity Council of Australia, the Climate Council and Climateworks.

Portrait of Angela Pippos

Angela Pippos

Angela Pippos is a journalist, television presenter, radio personality, author and MC.

Angela left her native South Australia in 1997 to pursue a sports journalism career with the ABC in Melbourne. She’s best known for anchoring the sports segment on the ABC TV News for almost a decade.

Searching for a new challenge in 2007, Angela ventured where no woman has dared go - the testosterone-charged world of breakfast sports radio.

She’s appeared on a number of sports programs including Network Ten’s Before the Game and The Back Page on Fox Sports.

Portrait of Darcy Vescio

Darcy Vescio

Darcy Vescio joined the Carlton women’s team as a marquee player in 2017.

The 23-year-old full-forward started playing footy when she was five, going on to win three VWFL premierships with the Darebin Falcons and representing the Victorian state team on two occasions. After being selected with pick three in the 2014 draft, Vescio has played for the Western Bulldogs for the last two years.

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Discussion

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