Portrait of Danielle Green

Danielle Green

Danielle Green is a Victorian Labor politician. She has been the member for Yan Yean for 11 and a half years, and is the Shadow Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence, Shadow Minister for Women and Shadow Minister for Health Promotion. She also sits on the Board of VicHealth.

Danielle has been a champion for women and girls – not just her whole working life, but her whole life. The eldest of four girls, she was educated at Catholic girls schools, of which she was recognised as an Inspiring Alumni at Emmanuel College, Warnambool.

She began her political activism as a 19 year old sole parent, advocating for access to contraceptive advice for women and girls in Regional Victoria. At 22, she became the Public Service Union’s inaugural chair of the equal ppportunity forum committee and sat on the affirmative action committees at the Ministries of Transport and Housing.

In the early 1990s, she edited Network, the Rural Women’s Network magazine, and from 1993 to 1996 during the turbulent Kennett era she was elected the Vice President of the Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU). She worked for the Victorian Trades Hall Council as Project Officer for women and enterprise bargaining and then the Labor Opposition and the Labor State Branch. She was an inaugural member of the Labor Women’s Network State Executive and member of the CPSU National Women’s Committee.

In 2002 she was elected to the district of Yan Yean, serving on various committees and holding various roles including Parliamentary Secretary for Police and Emergency Service. An early member of Emily’s List and a founding member of Women’s Health in the North (WHIN), she also played a prominent role in Victoria’s abortion law reform.

In 2012 she represented Australia at the UN International Parliamentarians’ Conference on the Implementation of the Population and Development Program of Action in Istanbul, Turkey.

Danielle is part of the State Labor caucus, which is currently has 43% of women. Should Labor be elected in the 2014 Victorian election, the caucus could actually comprise of equal numbers.