Quarterly Essay: On Politics and Conservation: Tim Flannery

Quarterly Essay: On Politics and Conservation: Tim Flannery

In the clash between money and conservation, money usually wins – with devastating results in a land that tolerates few mistakes. Tim Flannery delivers a wake-up call about the consequences of unrestrained development, in an Australia where we’re now mining our native parks. Instead of seeing our natural resources as currency to be spent or traded, how can we conserve and co-exist with our environment?

Launching his Quarterly Essay, ‘After the Future: Australia’s New Extinction Crisis’, Flannery discusses key points of environmental policy that need urgent attention, and considers the role of governments, the public and individuals in the struggle over the planet’s health. Hosted by Jane Rawson.

Who?

Portrait of Jane Rawson

Jane Rawson

Jane Rawson writes novels, novellas, stories and non-fiction, mostly about the environment. Her most recent novel, From the Wreck, was longlisted for the Miles Franklin, shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis award and won the Aurealis Award for Science Fiction. She is from Canberra, has lived in Melbourne for 14 years, and is about to move to Tasmania.

Portrait of Tim Flannery

Tim Flannery

Tim Flannery has published over thirty books including the award-winning The Future EatersThe Weather Makers, Atmosphere of Hope and Here on Earth and the novel The Mystery of the Venus Island Fetish. In 2005 he was named Australian Humanist of the Year, and in 2007, Australian of the Year.

In 2007 he co-founded and was appointed Chair of the Copenhagen Climate Council. In 2011 he became Australia’s Chief Climate Commissioner, and in 2013 he founded the Australian Climate Council. His current book is Sunlight and Seaweed.

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