Not Racist, But …: The Media and Racism

Not Racist, But ...: The Media and Racism

How does a person’s race or religion frame how the way they’re portrayed in the media? How do news narratives perpetuate racism?

In this panel – the final in a series of four talks curated by Santilla Chingaipe – Karen Farquharson, Usha Rodrigues, Anthony Kelly and Oishee Alam discuss racial sensationalism and stereotype in the Australian news today.

Who?

Portrait of Karen Farquharson

Karen Farquharson

Karen Farquharson is Professor of Sociology and Head of the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne. Her research focuses on the sociology of racism, migration, media and sport.

Her most recent books are (with Vivienne Waller and Deborah Dempsey) Qualitative Social Research: Contemporary Methods for the Digital Age (SAGE 2016) and (with Timothy Marjoribanks) Sport and Society in the Global Age (Palgrave Macmillan 2012). Karen holds MA and PhD degrees from Harvard University and a BA from the University of California, Berkeley.

Portrait of Usha Rodrigues

Usha Rodrigues

Usha Rodrigues is a Senior Lecturer in Deakin University’s Journalism program. 

An experienced journalist and journalism educator, Usha’s work spans across national borders, particularly in Australia and India. Her PhD and two subsequent co-authored books have established her as a scholar in India media; while she continues to research topics in new media, social media and citizen media in Australia.

Usha's recent research projects include 'Cultural Diversity and News in Australia', 'Social Media and Political Communication in India' and 'Capacity-building and Knowledge-Sharing in Citizen Journalism Enterprise in Australia and India'.

 

Portrait of Oishee Alam

Oishee Alam

Oishee Alam is a sociologist of race and religion, with a research and teaching focus on racism and anti-racism, Islamophobia, racialisation, nationalism, secularism and whiteness.

As a Research Fellow at the Challenging Racism Project at Western Sydney University, she is working to increase understandings of bystander action as a means of countering racism among Australian school students. Oishee completed her doctoral thesis in 2016, where she explored how white Australian converts to Islam conceptualised and negotiated race and racial identity after their conversion to Islam.

Portrait of Anthony Kelly

Anthony Kelly

Anthony Kelly has over 25 years of experience in human rights advocacy and strategic social justice campaigning. Prior to joining the Flemington Kensington Community Legal Centre in early 2011, he was Coordinator of the Men’s Referral Service for seven years, as well as Policy Officer with the Federation of Community Legal Centres and Training Coordinator with the Youth Referral and Independent Person Program (YRIPP).

Anthony co-founded Peace Brigades International – Australia. He has been an associate with the Change Agency and a campaigner, trainer and consultant with over 40 Australian and international social change campaigns.