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Podcast episodeCover image for of #8 So Sad, So Sexy, So Non-Compliant

Pill Pop

8 So Sad, So Sexy, So Non-Compliant  /  Bodies

Photo of Kaitlyn Blythe

Did you know that Halle Berry is diabetic? Izzie's dad once told them that and they've never fact-checked it. They think he meant it to be encouraging, like, 'Hey, you’ll be okay, see? Catwoman has diabetes,' but unfortunately that movie was terrible. In this episode of Pill Pop, hosts Silvi and Izzie speak with writer and performer Kaitlyn Blythe about media representation of chronically ill people. They’ll give you the good, the bad, and the Jeremy Renner in what was easily the hardest time they’ve had staying on topic in an interview.

Kaitlyn Blythe is a writer and performer living in Naarm (Melbourne) and dealing with encephalomyelitis, also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. She also has a podcast, Just A Spoonful (currently on hiatus), where she talks to other chronically ill folks, and is working on her first book, a collection of essays about life with a disability.

Content warning: this episode includes discussions of physical and mental illness, hospitals, medical trauma.

Further reading An Inconvenience by Kaitlyn Plyley, Seizure, published 19 January 2017
The ‘feminist’ advice that is actually holding women back by Kaitlyn Plyley, Sydney Morning Herald, published 3 January 3 2017 A Deep Dive Into The Latest (And Completely Bonkers) Taylor Swift Fan Theories by Kaitlyn Plyley, Junkee, published 28 February 2019 Get in touch

We want to hear from our listeners! Tweet us your non-compliant body stories at @PillPopCast, or send us an email at pillpoppodcast@gmail.com. 

In this episode

Hosted, produced and edited by Silvi Vann-Wall and Izzie Austin. Writer and perfromer Kaitlyn Blythe, formerly Kaitlyn Plyley, is our guest.

Recorded at Studio 757, Melbourne and Silvi and Izzie's respective home offices. This series is produced in partnership with the Wheeler Centre's Signal Boost programme. Mentorship and production support from Bec Fary.

Music: 'Dip Dop' by Barrie Gledden; 'Sad Marimba Planet' and 'More on That Later' by Lee Rosevere. Sound effects sourced from SoundSnap and Klankbeeld.

Transcript

A transcript of this episode will be available soon.

 
Podcast episodeCover image for of Broadly Speaking: Aileen Moreton-Robinson: 20th Anniversary of Talkin' Up to the White Woman

The Wheeler Centre

Broadly Speaking: Aileen Moreton-Robinson: 20th Anniversary of Talkin’ Up to the White Woman  /  First Nations

It's been 20 years since Aileen Moreton-Robinson wrote Talkin’ Up to the White Woman, the seminal work of Australian First Nations scholarship that exposed the blinding whiteness, and the serious limitations, of Australian feminist thought. 

In her book, Moreton-Robinson traces and honours the history of Indigenous women’s activism in Australia and lays bare some uncomfortable truths about white women’s complicity in racial oppression. She exposes, too, the prevalence of biased and blinkered thought prevalent within white feminist academia. Talkin’ Up to the White Woman has shaped the thinking of feminist and First Nations scholars across the globe.

Aileen Moreton-Robinson

To launch our Broadly Speaking series, we’re presenting the formidable Moreton-Robinson in conversation with critical race and whiteness scholar Fiona Nicoll. The pair discuss the twentieth anniversary of Talkin’ Up to the White Woman. What questions and experiences informed the writing of the book, and how does it seek to understand power? How did Moreton-Robinson experience colonialism in academia? How do some feminist movements clash with ideas of Indigenous sovereignty – and what are some alternative ways of thinking?

A transcript of this event is available to read here.

Presented in collaboration with State Library of Queensland and RMIT Social and Global Studies Centre.

The Broadly Speaking series is proudly supported by Krystyna Campbell-Pretty AM and family.

#TWCBroadlySpeaking

 
Podcast episodeCover image for of #7 The Bureaucracy of Being Unwell

Pill Pop

7 The Bureaucracy of Being Unwell  /  Health & medicine

Sadly, Lara Irvine passed away before this episode was released. The interview is being released in accordance with her family's wishes and to honour Lara's memory.

Lara Irvine and her dog

So you’ve got your diagnosis down pat, you’ve found a doctor – or team of doctors – who have helped get your illness under control, and you’ve worked out you’re too sick to work (in the traditional sense). Now’s the time to apply for government assistance, and that’s an easy process that’s not dehumanising, right? Of course not! That would be a much shorter interview! Many disabled and chronically ill people find themselves having to become experts in navigating the bureaucracy of government support just to get the help they need to survive. In this episode of Pill Pop, hosts Silvi and Izzie interview one such person: Lara Irvine.

Lara Irvine was a writer from Ballarat who dealt with a number of chronic conditions including scleroderma, which almost completely shut down her digestive system. The year before she died, she told us about her experiences of trying to prove to the NDIS that she qualified for the support she needed.

Content warning: this episode includes discussions of severe illness, hospitals, medical trauma.

Please note: In this episode, the following acronyms are used: NDIS – National Disability Insurance Scheme; DSP – Disability Support Pension.

Further reading 'People are worse off': NDIS funding gaps leave many without care in Victoria by Dominic Cansdale and Kirsten Diprose, ABC Ballarat, published 26 October 2017  Drastic pre-wedding diets. Would you do this? by Lara Irvine, Mamamia, published 20 April 2012

Get in touch

We want to hear from our listeners! Tweet us your stories of navigating government support systems at @PillPopCast, or send us an email at pillpoppodcast@gmail.com. 

In this episode

Hosted, produced and edited by Silvi Vann-Wall and Izzie Austin. Writer Lara Irvine is our guest.

Recorded at Studio 757, Melbourne and Silvi and Izzie's respective home offices. This series is produced in partnership with the Wheeler Centre's Signal Boost programme. Mentorship and production support from Bec Fary.

Music: 'Dip Dop' by Barrie Gledden; 'Sad Marimba Planet', 'Thought Bubbles' and 'More on That Later' by Lee Rosevere. Sound…

Anything and everything in Biography & memoir from across our archives.

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