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Ten Stories of Melbourne

The anniversary celebrations kick off with a gala night of readings and storytelling at Deakin Edge. Hear from ten brilliant writers – both established and emerging – who have made Melbourne home for either a short time or a lifetime. Where, for them, does Melbourne come alive on the page? Which classic stories and scenes of Melbourne are part of our literary DNA, and how are a new generation of writers remaking the city with words?

Presented in partnership with the Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature Office.

Readings will be our bookseller for this event.

This event will be Auslan interpreted.

Who?

Portrait of Tony Birch

Tony Birch

Tony Birch is the author of Ghost River, which won the 2016 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing, and Blood, which was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award. He is also the author of Shadowboxing, and three short story collections – Father’s Day, The Promise and Common People.

Tony is a frequent contributor to ABC local and national radio, and a regular guest at writers’ festivals. He lives in Melbourne and is a Senior Research Fellow at Victoria University.

Portrait of Jane Rawson

Jane Rawson

Jane Rawson writes novels, novellas, stories and non-fiction, mostly about the environment. Her most recent novel, From the Wreck, was longlisted for the Miles Franklin, shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis award and won the Aurealis Award for Science Fiction. She is from Canberra, has lived in Melbourne for 14 years, and is about to move to Tasmania.

Portrait of Alice Pung

Alice Pung

Alice Pung is the bestselling author of Her Father’s Daughter, which won the 2012 Western Australia Premier’s Literary Awards, and Unpolished Gem which won the 2007 Australian Book Industry Newcomer of the Year Award; and is also published in the UK, Germany, Indonesia and the US. She is also the editor of Growing Up Asian in Australia.

Portrait of Sumudu Samarawickrama

Sumudu Samarawickrama

Sumudu Samarawickrama is from Werribee, Australia. Her work has appeared in Boston Review and Overland. Sumudu is part of FCAC’s West Writers Group, and is writing a collection of surreal sci-fi.

Portrait of Jennifer Down

Jennifer Down

Jennifer Down is a writer and editor whose work has appeared in publications including the Age, the Saturday Paper, Australian Book Review and Overland. Our Magic Hour, her debut novel, was shortlisted for the 2014 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript. She lives in Melbourne.

Portrait of Moreno Giovannoni

Moreno Giovannoni

Moreno Giovannoni was born in San Ginese but grew up in a house on a hill, on a tobacco farm at Buffalo River in north-east Victoria. He is a freelance translator of long standing. The Fireflies of Autumn: And Other Tales of San Ginese is his first book.

How much?

This is a free event. Bookings are essential. We recommend arriving early to secure your seat. Read our ticketing FAQs here.Book your tickets

Our City of Literature

Melbourne has always been a city of literature. Our population is bursting with rabid readers and writers. We have the best libraries, the coolest bookshops, the finest festivals and some truly pioneering publishers. Also, Monkey Grip is set here and we are the best at wearing turtlenecks.

So it made perfect sense when, in 2008, Melbourne joined the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and made it official – becoming a designated City of Literature in recognition of our literary spirit. Today, there are 28 cities of literature around the world, including Edinburgh, Krakow, Iowa City and Reykjavik. In November, we’ll mark the anniversary of our designation over three days of fun and gloriously indoor celebrations.

Come and hear stories of our storied city – then, join a debate about the past, present and future of Melbourne as a City of Literature. What literary trends were we preoccupied with ten years ago, and what will our bookish future look like? What’s it like to live here – are we complacent or spoiled? What does it really mean to be named a City of Literature – does it help or hinder our culture? We’ll nut it out in two-day event modelled around the idea of a city parliament.

Presented in partnership with the Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature Office.

Presented in partnership with