Series

Question Time

View all events in this series

at The Wheeler Centre

Radicalisation

In the nineties, ‘radical’ was a term of enthusiastic approval. Two decades later, though, it’s the darker connotations of the expression (or word) that take precedence.

In Australia today, white nationalists, ISIS supporters and anarchists frequent news headlines, while the mainstream – public figures, politicians – has emboldened fringe groups. What are the driving forces behind radicalisation in Australia, and how are our law enforcement agencies responding to the shifting threats presented by radicalised individuals?

In this Question Time session, join host Madeleine Morris to put your questions to three experts – and draw from their radically different perspectives on what may be the most complex socio-political phenomenon of our era.

Who?

Portrait of Madeleine Morris

Madeleine Morris

Madeleine Morris is a Melbourne-based reporter for ABC television’s 7.30. She was formerly a presenter for the BBC in London and reported from dozens of countries before returning to her native Australia. She is the author of Guilt-Free Bottle-Feeding: Why Your Formula-Fed Baby Can Grow Up To Be Happy, Healthy and Smart, published by Finch. 

Portrait of Irfan Yusuf

Irfan Yusuf

Irfan Yusuf is a lawyer and commentator who writes on national security, cultural diversity and conservative politics. He has been published in Crikey, The Canberra Times, The Drum, and the Australian among others. He has appeared on The Project and RN's God Forbid! 

Portrait of John Safran

John Safran

John Safran is a writer and filmmaker who always gets in too deep for his own good. His debut book, Murder in Mississippi, won the Ned Kelly Award for best true crime. His follow up, Depends What You Mean by Extremist, found him lost among radicals and was shortlisted for the Australian Book Industry Awards. His wild and hilarious documentaries, such as ‘John Safran vs God’ and ‘Jedis & Juggalos’, have received accolades from the Australian Film Institute and Rose d’Or Festival.

His latest book is Puff Piece: How Philip Morris set vaping alight (and burned down the English language).

Portrait of Joumanah El Matrah

Joumanah El Matrah

Joumanah El Matrah is the CEO of the Australian Muslim Women's Centre for Human Rights (AMWCHR) and a PhD student at Swinburne University – her Doctorate is on counter terrorism and its impact on Muslim communities. Joumanah has published a number of works on Muslim women in Australia. Trained as a psychologist, Ms El Matrah is a community development worker and has been active in the community welfare sector for 20 years.

Question Time

When you think ‘question time’, perhaps you picture rowdy politicians cussing each other out. But in our regular series, we’re putting the dignity back into proceedings … along with a generous amount of time. It’s one full hour of pure Q&A between you, our audience, moderator Madeleine Morris, and a panel of experts in the evening’s chosen field of inquiry. Get informed about the key issues of our time. BYO hot potatoes and burning questions.

Hosted by Madeleine Morris.

Where?

More about this venue, including large map, parking, public transport and accessibility.