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Our City of Literature

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Parliament: Melbourne, 2008

It’s 2008. We’re about to become a City of Literature … but what does a literary city have to do and be? And what would a parliament of the City of Literature look like? Step back in time – and into the hypothetical chamber – as we hammer out a shape for our literary city.

The Speaker of the House will formally open the first parliamentary session, call us to order and introduce the press gallery. Then, our elected representatives from across the literary world – including writers, librarians, publishers and booksellers – will be sworn in on a book of their choosing, before delivering maiden speeches outlining their visions for constituent readers and writers in Melbourne.

Presented in partnership with the Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature Office.

Who?

Portrait of Alison Croggon

Alison Croggon

Alison Croggon is an award-winning novelist, poet, librettist and critic. She has published eight collections of poetry and several novels, including the acclaimed fantasy quintet The Books of Pellinor, Black Spring and The River and the Book

 

Portrait of Beth Driscoll

Beth Driscoll

Beth Driscoll is a Lecturer in Publishing and Communications at the University of Melbourne, and is part of a team that recently received a Romance Writers of America academic grant to study the genre world of romance in twenty-first century Australia. 

Portrait of Lili Wilkinson

Lili Wilkinson

Lili Wilkinson is the award-winning author of twelve YA novels, including Pink, Green Valentine and The Boundless Sublime. She established the insideadog website, the Inky Awards and the Inkys Creative Reading Prize at the Centre for Youth Literature, State Library of Victoria. She has a PhD in Creative Writing, and lives in Melbourne with her husband, son, dog and three chickens. Her latest book is After the Lights Go Out.

Portrait of Lachlann Carter

Lachlann Carter

Lachlann Carter is co-founder of 100 Story Building, a centre for young writers in Footscray that has 99 floors below ground accessible via a secret trapdoor.

Portrait of Christine Gordon

Christine Gordon

Christine Gordon is the Programming Manager of Melbourne’s pre-eminent independent bookshop, Readings, and has been in that role for over a decade. She considers this the best job in Australia. Christine was one of the founding members of the Stella Prize, sits on the Readings Foundation board and has been a judge on various literary awards. She is passionate about Australian literature and  ensuring that reading continues to allow endless possibilities for everyone.

Portrait of Marian Blythe

Marian Blythe

Marian Blythe is director of Australia's premier independent comic art festival, Homecooked, and is publicity manager at Black Inc. books.

She wrote, produced, and performed in the sellout storytelling show Lose the Plot at Melbourne Fringe Festival, and has hosted numerous radio and podcast shows. She can sometimes be found teaching digital media and promotion, or as the enigmatic lead singer of a non-existent Melbourne punk band.

 

Portrait of Shalini Kunahlan

Shalini Kunahlan

Shalini Kunahlan is Marketing Manager at Melbourne-based independent Text Publishing. She has worked in publishing for over a decade – her interests include digital marketing and bettering diversity outcomes within publishing. She is the inaugural winner of the ABIA Rising Star Award.

Portrait of Sam Cooney

Sam Cooney

Sam Cooney runs the literary organisation TLB, which houses the independent book publishing press Brow Books and quarterly literary magazine The Lifted Brow, as well as running a website, writing prizes, events, and more. He is publisher-in-residence at RMIT, teaches sessionally at several universities, and is a freelance writer and literary critic.

Portrait of Jax Jacki Brown

Jax Jacki Brown

Jax Jacki Brown is a disability and LGBTIQ rights activist, writer and educator. She is a member of the Victorian Ministerial Council on Women's Equality, the Victorian governments' LGBTI taskforce Health and Human Services Working Group and the Victorian Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission’s Disability Reference Group. 

 

Portrait of Sista Zai Zanda

Sista Zai Zanda

Sista Zai Zanda is a storyteller, educator and curator of the Pan Afrikan Poets Cafe – an Afro-Literary matinée of beats, performance and poetry. Since 2015, Zai has spoiled audiences in Melbourne and Sydney with over 100 performances by African and First Nations storytellers including feature performances by renowned international artists Mahogany L Browne (NYC, Nuyorican Poets Cafe), Inua Ellams (Nigeria/UK), Kat François (Trinidad/UK) and Jive Poetic (NYC). 

Portrait of Maxine Beneba Clarke

Maxine Beneba Clarke

Maxine Beneba Clarke is the author of six books, including the ABIA and Indie award-winning short fiction collection Foreign Soil (2014), and the critically acclaimed memoir The Hate Race (2016), which is currently being adapted for the Australian stage. Her poetry collection Carrying The World won the 2017 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for Poetry.

Portrait of Elizabeth Flux

Elizabeth Flux

Elizabeth Flux is an award-winning writer and editor whose fiction and nonfiction work has been widely published. She is a judge for the 2019 Award for and Unpublished Manuscript for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards and is an editor for Melbourne City of Literature’s ‘Reading Victoria’ project. In 2017 she was the recipient of a Wheeler Centre Hot Desk Fellowship, was a judge for the Scribe Prize, was the winner of the inaugural Feminartsy Fiction Prize, and her short story ‘One’s Company’ was selected for Best Australian Stories 2017.

Portrait of Claire G. Coleman

Claire G. Coleman

Claire G. Coleman is a writer from Western Australia. She identifies with the South Coast Noongar people. Her family are associated with the area around Ravensthorpe and Hopetoun. Claire grew up in a Forestry's settlement in the middle of a tree plantation, where her dad worked, not far out of Perth.

She wrote her black&write! fellowship-winning manuscript Terra Nullius while travelling around Australia in a caravan. Terra Nullius was published by Hachette Australia and will be available in North America in 2018 with Small Beer Press. Terra Nullius won the Norma K Hemming Award, and was shortlisted for the 2018 Stella Prize and for Best Sci-Fi Novel in the 2017 Aurealis Awards.

Portrait of Justine Hyde

Justine Hyde

Justine Hyde is Director, Experience at the State Library Victoria where she leads the libraries onsite and digital experience, brand and audience development, exhibitions and programs. Justine is a regular speaker on the topic of transforming libraries for the 21st century both in Australia and overseas. She is also a writer and critic published in the Age, the Saturday Paper, the Australian, Meanjin, Kill Your Darlings, Seizure, the Wheeler Centre and Women's Agenda.

Portrait of Candy Bowers

Candy Bowers

Candy Bowers is an award-winning writer, actor, social-activist, comedian and producer. The co-artistic director of Black Honey Company, Candy has pioneered a fierce sub-genre of hip hop theatre that delves into the heart of radical feminist dreaming.

 

Portrait of Emilie Collyer

Emilie Collyer

Emilie Collyer writes plays, prose and poetry. Her writing has appeared in Cordite, Overland, the Lifted Brow, Kill Your Darlings and Aurealis, among others. Recent award winning and nominated plays include: Contest, Dream Home, The Good Girl (New York, Hollywood and Florida) and Once Were Pirates (Edinburgh and Adelaide Fringe). Emilie is currently a Red Stitch INK writer and a Playwriting Australia Duologue recipient.

Portrait of Kirsty Murray

Kirsty Murray

Kirsty Murray was born in Melbourne and its stories run through her veins.  An author of books for children and young adults, her works include 11 award-winning novels plus non-fiction, junior fiction, historical fiction, speculative fiction and picture books. Kirsty has been a Creative Fellow of the State Library of Victoria, an Asialink Literature Resident in India and an Ambassador for the Victorian Premier’s Reading Challenge and the Stella Prize in Schools Program. In 2008, Kirsty was proud to be on the steering committee of Melbourne's bid to become a UNESCO City of Literature.

Portrait of Eleanor Jackson

Eleanor Jackson

Eleanor Jackson is a Filipino Australian poet, performer, arts producer and radio broadcaster.

She is the producer of the Melbourne Poetry Map, and a former editor-in-chief of Peril Magazine and board member for the Queensland Poetry Festival. She is currently chair of the board for Peril Magazine and a board member of the Stella Prize.

 

Portrait of Alia Gabres

Alia Gabres

Alia Gabres is a Melbourne based creative producer, cultural broker and storyteller.

She has worked with diverse and creative communities in Melbourne in various roles such as Lead Creative Producer for Industry and Creative Initiatives at the Footscray Community Arts Centre, and Lead Youth Arts and Events Producer for the City of Brimbank.

She has recently completed a residency at the New Jersey Performing Arts Centre in the USA, exploring new frameworks for broader and more diverse engagement in the arts.

She has designed and delivered innovative programming such as the ‘West Writers’ programme in Melbourne's Western suburbs, and worked as Lead Producer on the innovative the ‘Creatively Ageing’ programme and the international Women of the World Festival in 2017.

How much?

This is a free event. Bookings are essential. We recommend arriving early to secure your seat. Read our ticketing FAQs here.Book your tickets

Our City of Literature

Melbourne has always been a city of literature. Our population is bursting with rabid readers and writers. We have the best libraries, the coolest bookshops, the finest festivals and some truly pioneering publishers. Also, Monkey Grip is set here and we are the best at wearing turtlenecks.

So it made perfect sense when, in 2008, Melbourne joined the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and made it official – becoming a designated City of Literature in recognition of our literary spirit. Today, there are 28 cities of literature around the world, including Edinburgh, Krakow, Iowa City and Reykjavik. In November, we’ll mark the anniversary of our designation over three days of fun and gloriously indoor celebrations.

Come and hear stories of our storied city – then, join a debate about the past, present and future of Melbourne as a City of Literature. What literary trends were we preoccupied with ten years ago, and what will our bookish future look like? What’s it like to live here – are we complacent or spoiled? What does it really mean to be named a City of Literature – does it help or hinder our culture? We’ll nut it out in two-day event modelled around the idea of a city parliament.

Presented in partnership with the Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature Office.

Where?

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