If you missed it, you can catch up on this recording of the event.

Series

Outbound

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at The Wheeler Centre

Landscape as Character

From Indigenous oral traditions, to the paintings of Eugene Von Guerard, to the books of Ethel Turner – the Australian landscape has proved a powerful and enduring presence in our national storytelling. But parts of our vast and diverse landscape are changing. Do the sweeping plains and ragged mountain ranges beloved of Dorothea Mackellar still inspire Australians and inform our sense of nation?

Panellists Alexis Wright, Cate Kennedy and Adrian Hyland have written extensively – and to critical acclaim – about Australia beyond city limits. Between them, through fiction and non-fiction, they’ve explored the freezing Tasmanian wilderness, the tropical Gulf of Carpentaria and the bushfire-prone communities of regional Victoria.  

We’ll ask them how urban sprawl, climate change, Indigenous affairs – even globalisation – affect the way Australian writers view and present the land today. Is the Australian landscape as powerful and evocative a character as ever? And, with such a diverse geography, does it even make sense to regard the land as a single literary subject? 

Who?

Portrait of Sophie Cunningham

Sophie Cunningham

Sophie Cunningham is a former publisher and editor and the author of four books, including the acclaimed Melbourne. 

Portrait of Alexis Wright

Alexis Wright

Alexis Wright is a member of the Waanyi nation of the Gulf of Carpentaria. She is an author and essayist writing in fiction and non-fiction. Wright has written widely on Indigenous rights and has organised two successful Indigenous Constitutional Conventions in Central Australia, Today We Talk About Tomorrow (1993) and the Kalkaringi Convention (1998).  

Portrait of Cate Kennedy

Cate Kennedy

Cate Kennedy is the author of the highly acclaimed novel The World Beneath, which won the People’s Choice Award in the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards in 2010. She is an award-winning short-story writer whose work has been published widely.

Portrait of Adrian Hyland

Adrian Hyland

Adrian Hyland is the award-winning author of Diamond Dove, Gunshot Road and Kinglake-350,which was shortlisted for the Prime Minister's Literary Award for non-fiction in 2012. He lives in St Andrews, north-east of Melbourne, and teaches at La Trobe University.

Outbound

A Week in the Country

Life in the country has a lot going for it. There’s the solitude, the scenery, the extra brain space available when your mind is not jammed with parking and public transport-related neuroses. Many of Australian literature’s best loved writers, from Henry Lawson to Miles Franklin to Colin Thiele, have taken life in the bush as their inspiration.

In a week of events with a special regional focus, we’ll get past the romance – and past the past – to focus on the realities of contemporary country Australia. We’ll find out from writers,  regional leaders and political figures about what matters in regional areas, from infrastructure and innovation to creative expression, cattle exports and climate change. In the heart of the city, join us for some conversations about life in the regions.

Stream it from the regions

By popular demand, we're offering everybody the chance to contribute remotely to Question Time: Regional Focus. We'll stream the event live via Periscope (download the app to your Apple or Android phone or tablet), and relay some of your questions to the panel in Melbourne on your behalf. Follow @wheelercentre or keep an eye on our Twitter feed to see when it's getting started.

Where?

More about this venue, including large map, parking, public transport and accessibility.