Photo: Éditions Guérin

at The Wheeler Centre

Jean-Christophe Rufin

Between his fiction and his humanitarian work, Jean-Christophe Rufin has been just about everywhere – from the Philippines to the Balkans, Afghanistan to Rwanda. He’s worked as a doctor in Latin America, an ambassador in Senegal, and a human rights activist in Latin America. It’s fitting, then, that Rufin is one of the founders of Doctors Without Borders – an organisation designed to provide medical aid in developing or war-torn countries, regardless of race or religion.

Rufin is also a writer, with wide-ranging interests: he’s the author of everything from the ‘Rufin Report’ on anti-semitism in France, to swashbuckling historical adventure novels and a forthcoming memoir, The Santiago Pilgrimage, about his journey along the Way of St. James.

In conversation with Santilla Chingaipe, Rufin will talk about striking a balance between creativity, travel, diplomacy, and humanitarianism – and what drove him to embark upon an 800km journey to Santiago de Compostela by foot.

 

Who?

Portrait of Jean-Christophe Rufin

Jean-Christophe Rufin

Jean-Christophe Rufin is a doctor, historian, novelist, and the former French Ambassador to Senegal and Gambia. Having worked for NGOs for more than 20 years, Rufin has led missions in Eritrea, Ethiopia, Afghanistan, the Philippines, Soudan, Rwanda and the Balkans. He is one of the founders of Doctors Without Borders. He was the administrator for the French Red Cross (1994-1996) and the president of Action contre la faim (2003-2006). 

Rufin has written historical and political essays, as well as science fiction and adventure novels. He is the author of numerous bestsellers, including The Abyssinian, for which he won the Goncourt Prize for a debut novel in 1997 and Brazil Red, the winner of the 2001 Goncourt Prize.  

Portrait of Santilla Chingaipe

Santilla Chingaipe

Zambian-born Santilla Chingaipe is an award winning journalist and documentary filmmaker. She spent seven years working for SBS World News, which saw her reporting from Kenya, South Sudan, Tanzania and Zambia and interviewing some of Africa’s most prominent leaders.

She reports extensively on Australia’s diverse African community and recently presented a one-off documentary for SBS, Date My Race, which aired in February. Santilla is currently directing and producing documentary on the complexities of Australia’s South Sudanese community.

Where?

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