Series

Ideas for Melbourne

View all events in this series

at The Wheeler Centre

Ending Homelessness

Tonight, 20,000 Victorians are homeless. How do we get people off the streets and into shelter? Should we give money – and if so, to individuals or organisations? Is homelessness inevitable – or can we make changes to end it once and for all?

With Alan Attwood, Heather Holst, Suzy Freeman-Greene and Spike Chiappalone.

Ideas for Melbourne

We’re kicking off 2013 with a series of public forums that take a closer look at the city we call home – and the problems and challenges facing Melbourne right now.

Make your voice heard as we debate Melbourne’s future – and the kind of city we want to live in.

Who?

Portrait of Heather Holst

Heather Holst

Heather is the CEO of HomeGround Services, a housing agency working in inner, northern and southern Melbourne. She has worked in the housing sector since 1989 and before that in the publishing industry. She holds a PhD in History.

Portrait of Alan Attwood

Alan Attwood

Alan Attwood, author and journalist, is a Walkley-award winner and former New York correspondent for The Age and Sydney Morning Herald. He has been editor of The Big Issue magazine since 2006.

Portrait of Suzy Freeman-Greene

Suzy Freeman-Greene

Suzy Freeman-Greene is a Melbourne journalist, writer and editor. Freeman-Greene's feature writing has appeared in publications including Good Weekend and the Australian magazine, and for many years she was a regular columnist with the Age. She is working on a series of essays about her mother’s life and death.

Portrait of Spike Chiappalone

Spike Chiappalone

Spike is currently a member of the CHP’s Peer Education Support Program. He is an ex long-term homeless person and began his role as a member of the Pesp team in early 2012.

Ideas for Melbourne

We’re kicking off 2013 with a series of public forums that take a closer look at the city we call home – and the problems and challenges facing Melbourne right now. What better way to begin than by engaging with the issues that directly affect us, every day?

We’ve chosen to focus on city planning, racism and homelessness, three topics that loom large in local debates – and will continue to dominate civic conversations in 2013.

Barely a week goes by without a planning incident, public transport screw-up or debate about our city boundaries or skyline. Racism is rarely discussed, but hit headlines in late 2012 when indigenous musician Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu was refused a cab ride home from his own concert. And while we’re never short on good initiatives or well-meaning campaigns to tackle homelessness, it remains an ongoing – and complex – problem.

Be part of the conversation about Melbourne’s future – and the kind of city we want to live in.

Where?

More about this venue, including large map, parking, public transport and accessibility.