The Fifth Estate: Regional Partnerships and Diplomatic Deals

The Fifth Estate: Regional Partnerships and Diplomatic Deals

How does the relationship between Australia and Indonesia work? In the past week Prime Minister Julia Gillard announced that three Indonesian nationals accused of people smuggling – who claimed to be minors at the time of their detainment – would be released from prison in Australia and sent home. Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has also approved a five-year reduction in the 20-year sentence of convicted drug smuggler Schapelle Corby.

What does this tell us about the relationship between our two countries, about changes in attitudes and about two very different legal systems? And what implications could this have for the two young Australian men who remain on death row in Bali?

Host Sally Warhaft discusses these issues with defence lawyer Julian McMahon, and Professor Tim Lindsey, director of the Asian Law Centre.

Who?

Portrait of Julian McMahon

Julian McMahon

Julian McMahon was admitted to practice in 1992. After working at Sly & Weigall and the OPP, he joined the Victorian Bar in 1998.

Portrait of Sally Warhaft

Sally Warhaft

Sally Warhaft is a Melbourne broadcaster, anthropologist and writer and the host of the Wheeler Centre’s live journalism series, the Fifth Estate, now in its sixth year. She is a former editor of the Monthly magazine and the author of the bestselling book Well May We Say: The Speeches that Made Australia.

Portrait of Tim Lindsey

Tim Lindsey

Tim Lindsey is Malcolm Smith Professor of Asian Law and Director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society at the University of Melbourne. He is also chair of DFAT’s Australia Indonesia Institute and was a member of the Reference Group for the former National Asian Languages and Studies in Schools Program.

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