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Not Racist, But … Racism in the Workplace

Listen to Not Racist, But … Racism in the Workplace

Photo of the panellists

From left to right: Santilla Chingaipe, Jackie Huggins, Yin Paradies and Lee Carnie — Photo: Jon Tjhia

While overt forms of racism in Australian workplaces are outlawed, many people from Indigenous and migrant backgrounds argue that racism is still pervasive – before and after joining a workplace. Last year, a major company’s employment listing overtly preferenced ‘candidates who are Anglo Saxon’. Multiple studies have shown that anglicising names on job applications improves a jobseeker’s prospects, prompting recent government trials of anonymous job applications.

So, how does racism manifest itself in the workplace – overtly, and covertly – and what impact does this have on both employee and employer? What can employers and governments do to address racial and religious discrimination at work? Santilla Chingaipe hosts a discussion of these issues and more, with Yin Paradies, Jackie Huggins and Lee Carnie.

Who?

Portrait of Santilla Chingaipe

Santilla Chingaipe

Santilla Chingaipe is a journalist and filmmaker whose work explores migration, cultural identities and politics. She is a regular contributor to the Saturday Paper, and serves as a member of the Federal Government’s Advisory Group on Australia-Africa Relations (AGAAR). 

Chingaipe wrote and directed the documentary series Third Culture Kids for the ABC. Other credits include the short documentary Black As Me.

Her first book of non-fiction detailing the stories of convicts of African descent transported to the Australian penal colonies, is forthcoming with Picador in 2021.

The recipient of several awards, Chingaipe was recognised at the United Nations as one of the most influential people of African descent in the world in 2019. 

Portrait of Yin Paradies

Yin Paradies

Professor Yin Paradies is an Aboriginal-Asian-Anglo Australian who is Chair in Race Relations and Indigenous Knowledges and Culture Coordinator at Deakin University. He conducts interdisciplinary research on the health, social and economic effects of racism as well as anti-racism theory, policy and practice across diverse settings, including government, workplaces, schools, universities, housing, the arts, museums and healthcare.

Portrait of Jackie Huggins

Jackie Huggins

Dr Jackie Huggins AM FAHA is Bidjara and Birri Gubba Juru from Queensland. Jackie is the Co-Chair of the National Congress of Australia's First Peoples. She was the National Co-ordinator for the Aboriginal Women's Unit in DAA in 1984 and on the Steering Committee for the Aboriginal Women's Task Force which produced the Women's Business report.

Portrait of Lee Carnie

Lee Carnie

Lee Carnie is a senior lawyer at the Human Rights Law Centre advocating for equality law reform and a national Charter of Human Rights, and the Director of Legal Advocacy at Equality Australia, Australia’s first national LGBTIQ+ legal advocacy and campaigning organisation. They are dedicated to tackling discrimination and building a movement for stronger human rights protections for all of us. 

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