Paul Keating and Kerry O'Brien

Paul Keating and Kerry O'Brien

Paul Keating is one Australia’s most intriguing, controversial and reforming political figures. Kerry O’Brien is among our most experienced and incisive political journalists. In this fast-moving conversation, Keating dives into his relationships with US leaders, British monarchs and their silverware; the pleasures of acupuncture and classical music; Keating's assessments of past and present Liberal leaders; the need for a treaty with Australia's Aboriginal nations; and the former prime minister's evaluations of his own political legacy.

Who?

Portrait of Paul Keating

Paul Keating

Paul Keating was prime minister of Australia from 1991 to 1996.

Keating became prime minister in December 1991 and led the ALP to an historic fifth term of Government in March 1993. As prime minister, he continued his progressive reform program, which included the establishment of a National Training Authority, a national superannuation scheme to redress low national savings and labour market and training reforms which addressed Australia’s long-term unemployment problems.

Other key achievements of the Keating Government included the review of the Sex Discrimination Act, the historic Mabo legislation recognising the land rights of Australia’s Indigenous people and the introduction of legislation ensuring protection of endangered species.

Following the defeat of the ALP in March 1996, Mr Keating resigned from Parliament. He continues to take a close interest in the national issues with which he was associated in public life. Mr Keating has been awarded Honorary Doctorates in Laws from both Keio University in Tokyo and the National University of Singapore. 

Portrait of Kerry O'Brien

Kerry O'Brien

Kerry O'Brien is one of Australia's most respected journalists, with six Walkley awards including the Gold Walkley and the Walkley for outstanding leadership in journalism.

In a career spanning more than fifty years, Kerry has worked for newspapers, television and a wire service, and as a foreign correspondent. Thirty-three of those years were at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation where he cut his teeth on the trail-blazing current affairs programs This Day Tonight and Four Corners. He was the inaugural presenter of Lateline for six years, the editor and presenter of 7.30 for fifteen years, and the presenter of Four Corners for five.

Listen to Paul Keating and Kerry O'Brien