Meanland: Reading Without Privacy

Meanland: Reading Without Privacy

Today, we’re all reading and writing more than ever, on text messages, on Twitter and on Facebook. But has social networking broken down the distinction between our public and our private lives? What are the rules for writing in forms that are so intimate and entirely open?

Jonathan Green, Alison Croggon, Jeff Sparrow and Sophie Cunningham discuss whether we tweet as ourselves or as representatives of our employers, and ask: is new media helping us work differently or just work harder?

Chaired by Michael Williams.

Who?

Portrait of Michael Williams

Michael Williams

Michael Williams is the Director of the Wheeler Centre.

Portrait of Alison Croggon

Alison Croggon

Alison Croggon is an award-winning novelist, poet, librettist and critic. She has published eight collections of poetry and several novels, including the acclaimed fantasy quintet The Books of Pellinor, Black Spring and The River and the Book

 

Portrait of Jonathan Green

Jonathan Green

Jonathan Green has been a working journalist since the late 1970s. This makes him both very old and reasonably experienced. After an early degree-ending flirtation with public radio, the bulk of Jonathan’s career has been spent in newspapers, beginning with a cadetship at the Canberra Times and taking in a small Cook’s tour of Australian dailies: the Melbourne Herald, the Herald Sun, the Sunday Herald, the Sunday Age and the Age. In mid-2015 he was appointed as editor of the literary quarterly Meanjin.

Portrait of Jeff Sparrow

Jeff Sparrow

Jeff Sparrow is a writer, editor and broadcaster. His most recent book is No Way But This: In Search of Paul Robeson. He writes a fortnightly column for the Guardian, is part of the Breakfasters team on 3RRR each week day morning and is also an Honorary Fellow at Victoria University. 

Portrait of Sophie Cunningham

Sophie Cunningham

Sophie Cunningham is a former publisher and editor and the author of four books, including the acclaimed Melbourne. 

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