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Podcast episodeCover image for of Radiolab, Risk and Genius: Jad Abumrad and Andrew Denton

Radiolab, Risk and Genius: Jad Abumrad and Andrew Denton  /  Radio

Radiolab is one of the world’s most popular podcasts. Admired for its gentle explorations of big questions, the show – which was collecting listeners in their millions long before podcasting arrived at the mainstream’s door – has won many significant awards. Abumrad himself has been awarded a prestigious MacArthur Genius Grant, and his incredibly labour-intensive sound designs complement killer editorial instincts and an elegant, accessible sense of curiosity.

In Melbourne for the first time, Abumrad chats with veteran broadcaster Andrew Denton. Perhaps best known for his landmark interview show Enough Rope, Denton’s first podcast, Better Off Dead – produced in partnership with the Wheeler Centre – topped Australia’s iTunes chart, drew widespread acclaim and stirred passionate public debate about voluntary assisted dying in this country.

Hear from one of the world’s foremost storytellers about creative discomfort, Australian inspiration, the music of language, the challenges now facing podcasters and communicators, and the hot, curious power of the uncertain.

'There's no room for serendipity in podcasting for people who don't agree with you. Unless you're one of those people who seeks out disagreement; those people are rare.'

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Podcast episodeCover image for of The Show of the Year 2016, Part Two

The Show of the Year 2016, Part Two  /  Performing arts & pop culture

The horror, the glory, the sublime and the ridiculous – 2016 served it all up in enormous doses. Join us for part two of the Wheeler Centre's annual Show of the Year – celebrating a year’s worth of highlights and lowlights.

Benson Saulo — Photo: Jon Tjhia

What happened in 2016? Well, the Panama Papers dropped. The Louvre flooded. A woman in New Jersey got stuck up a tree while playing Pokémon Go in a cemetery. And Brangelina was reduced to its component parts. What else? England voted for Boaty McBoatface … then Brexit. Brazil impeached its president. Ceasefire attempts failed in Syria and we were rocked by attacks in Brussels, Paris, Orlando and Baghdad. This was the year the United States elected Donald Trump. It was also the year we said goodbye to David Bowie, Muhammad Ali, Harper Lee, Leonard Cohen and Prince. 

Closer to home, Turnbull was returned (only just) as Prime Minister. Our census was a mess, but Chloe Esposito triumphed in the modern pentathlon at Rio and the Western Bulldogs won the AFL Grand Final. We were the crowd favourites at Eurovision and we fell in love with Matilda all over again with Tim Minchin’s Matilda the Musical.

Your host for the Show of the Year is silver-tongued songbird Casey Bennetto. For the second half of the year, he's joined by Benson Saulo, Geraldine Hickey, Tim Flannery, Cal Wilson and Danny McGinlay – tackling Indigenous leadership, Leonard Cohen's death, Donald Trump, the Western Bulldogs' win, climate and #censusfail.

Sit back, relax and relive the best and worst as a bevy of Australia’s finest writers and entertainers farewell the year that was – in five-minute bursts of stories and song.

Listen to part one   Podcast episode The Show of the Year 2016, Part One  /  Performing arts & pop culture

Geraldine Hickey takes the pulse of the nation — Photo: Jon Tjhia

Danny McGinlay celebrates some big wins of the year — Photo: Jon Tjhia

Casey Bennetto sings us home — Photo: Jon Tjhia

 
Podcast episodeCover image for of The Show of the Year 2016, Part One

The Show of the Year 2016, Part One  /  Performing arts & pop culture

The horror, the glory, the sublime and the ridiculous – 2016 served it all up in enormous doses. Join us for part one of the Wheeler Centre's annual Show of the Year – celebrating a year’s worth of highlights and lowlights.

What happened in 2016? Well, the Panama Papers dropped. The Louvre flooded. A woman in New Jersey got stuck up a tree while playing Pokémon Go in a cemetery. And Brangelina was reduced to its component parts. What else? England voted for Boaty McBoatface … then Brexit. Brazil impeached its president. Ceasefire attempts failed in Syria and we were rocked by attacks in Brussels, Paris, Orlando and Baghdad. This was the year the United States elected Donald Trump. It was also the year we said goodbye to David Bowie, Muhammad Ali, Harper Lee, Leonard Cohen and Prince. 

Nkechi Anele performs 'Purple Rain' — Photo: Emily Sexton

Closer to home, Turnbull was returned (only just) as Prime Minister. Our census was a mess, but Chloe Esposito triumphed in the modern pentathlon at Rio and the Western Bulldogs won the AFL Grand Final. We were the crowd favourites at Eurovision and we fell in love with Matilda all over again with Tim Minchin’s Matilda the Musical.

Your host for the Show of the Year is silver-tongued songbird Casey Bennetto. For the first half of the year, he's joined by Geraldine Quinn, Shireen Morris, Jennifer Byrne, Tom Ballard, Nkechi Anele, Osamah Sami and Deborah Conway and Willy Zygier. They tackle events including the deaths of Prince and Harper Lee, Boaty McBoatface and Brexit.

Sit back, relax and relive the best and worst as a bevy of Australia’s finest writers and entertainers farewell the year that was – in five-minute bursts of stories and song.

Listen to part two   Podcast episode The Show of the Year 2016, Part Two  /  Performing arts & pop culture

Jennifer Byrne pays tribute to Harper Lee — Photo: Emily Sexton

Tom Ballard on Boaty McBoatface — Photo: Jon Tjhia

Osamah Sami on the Logies, political correctness and Arab greetings — Photo: Jon Tjhia

Anything and everything in Race, religion & identity from across our archives.

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