The Fifth Estate: Mark Carnegie on Civic Responsibility

The Fifth Estate: Mark Carnegie on Civic Responsibility

At the inaugural Di Gribble Argument, outspoken venture capitalist Mark Carnegie called for Australia to introduce a compulsory (non-military) national service.

His ideas include bringing older Australians and students together for mentoring and wisdom transfer, instituting randomly chosen juries of citizens to deliberate and decide on public issues (taking responsibility for key elements of the government’s work) and giving a voice to ordinary people through crowdsourcing.

He believes this would establish a culture of active participation in society and democracy, and ward off social threat. Describing civic service as ‘our means of defence,’ Carnegie has called his proposition ‘the maintenance program Australia needs.’

In this special spotlight edition of the Fifth Estate, Mark spoke to host Sally Warhaft about the ideas he put forward with his argument, and joins her in dissecting and negotiating them.

The Di Gribble Argument is a new annual occasion to remember the legacy of publisher, editor and businesswoman Di Gribble, whose impact on the world of books, writing and ideas cannot be overstated.

Who?

Portrait of Mark Carnegie

Mark Carnegie

Mark Carnegie is Principal of M.H. Carnegie & Co. He was previously Head of LCW Private Equity, Lazard’s Australian private equity business. He has had a near twenty five year career as an investor and corporate adviser in New York, London, and Sydney.

Portrait of Sally Warhaft

Sally Warhaft

Sally Warhaft is a Melbourne broadcaster, anthropologist and writer and the host of the Wheeler Centre’s live journalism series, the Fifth Estate, now in its fifth year. She is a former editor of The Monthly magazine and the author of the bestselling book Well May We Say: The Speeches that Made Australia.